Tag Archives: Financial Literacy

Best Reads Of This Week: A Real Financial TV Show, US Lacking Literacy, & New Distressed Investing

Finally, An Idea For A Legitimate Show On Investing

Every day at my internship, the mounted televisions show a muted CNBC. While the channel sometimes does show decent programming (interviews with industry leaders are about all I’ll watch), a majority of it is just useless noise that investors shouldn’t bother with. The worst part about some of the programming is that people will make emotional-based trades (the worst kind) based off of what some “financial pundit” says on TV. It’s important to remember that the pundit making these recommendation has no idea about your background, education, financial standing, needs, or goals and top of that, they’re right about their picks about as often as you are. Most don’t realize this fact because the financial gurus on TV aren’t actually held accountable for their picks. When was the last time you heard one of them say “Oh, uh…yeah, last month I told you to buy XXX company and now it’s down XX%. I’m sorry about that.”? The answer is “Never.”

One of my favorite blogs to read consistently, A Wealth of Common Sense, recently featured on article on how to create a solid television show about investing. Here are Ben’s thoughts on his idea for a financial TV show that will cater to a long-term investor

– It would only be on once a week.

-Weekly guests would include the different ETF and mutual fund providers along with portfolio managers to explain their strategies and fund options.

-The audience could call/email/tweet their questions on the portfolio management process.

-There would also be a financial advisor segment to discuss how they run their client portfolios and any issues that seem to come up on a regular basis.

-Guests would get at least 15-20 minutes a piece instead of the 5 minute soundbites they get now so they could explain themselves and their positions in detail (other guests would include authors, bloggers, academic researchers and successful individual investors).

-Obviously, you would need many different voices to share their experiences and thoughts since there isn’t a single way of doing things.

-A focal point would be investor behavior and how human nature messes with our decision-making process. There is talk of the ‘dumb money’ from time to time on financial programs these days, but not much coverage gets paid to the long list of cognitive biases that seem to affect every investor, both professional and novice, in different ways.

Ben really hits the nail on the head with this article and it would be delightful to see a show on TV that actually educates its audience on the fundamentals and what’s really important. Now if this was made into a show, I would actually watch intently and encourage others to do the same. However, it’s not likely to ever happen as it wouldn’t feature men screaming at exchanges and other annoying eye-catching “entertainment” that the current programming is so fond of.


Lack Of Literacy

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According to a study by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, American teens are lagging behind in financial literacy, especially when compared to top countries like China and Belgium. The executive director of the Foundation for Financial Planning, Jim Peniston had a quote that caught my eye:

“I don’t put it on the school system, I put it on our generation. What do kids learn? They learn from what they see at home.”

I agree and disagree with Jim on this quote. I do believe it is important for parents to teach their children the value of money, the importance of saving, and to educate them on the rest of the financial basics. However, I do believe that the lack of financial literacy is a failure of our education system. Financial literacy is one of the most important skills to be taught in schools, from elementary to university, as I wrote about here. I’d go as far as to argue that a student’s level of financial literacy is far more important than their GPA. Those that don’t understand it generally end up taking on more debt, accumulating less wealth, and being poorly prepared for retirement or personal emergencies. While I do believe that this should be taught by parents, I see no excuse as to why it has not been taught in schools. It gives kids a solid foundation for financial well-being and will prove useful throughout their entire lives, unlike, you know, an art class.


Golf Courses: The New Distressed Asset Investing

Private equity firms are heading into new assets, like troubled US golf courses. The last decade hasn’t been good for most of those in the golf business. The boom in new golfers with the emergence of Tiger Woods as a dominant player in the late 90’s and early 2000’s has faded away. That, paired with tough economic times has led to a decline in new golfers, rounds played, and overall profits of golf courses. Last year, only 14 new courses opened while 157 closed down as owners decided to shut their doors rather than continue to take losses with the extensive operating expenses that are required for basic course upkeep.

It will be interesting to see how these investments pay off. While I’m not sure that golf will ever return to the Tiger-mania days that had new golfers out to the courses in droves, I think it could make a rebound if younger golfers get hooked again. The PGA is rolling out its new “A Quick Nine” initiative to get golfers to play nine holes, versus the typical four hour 18 hole round. Perhaps a shorter time commitment could attract more people that aren’t willing to spend half their day playing golf. Regardless, it will be important for these private equity firms to find a way to create value for a new version of customers if they really want to turn the business around. I believe that this could come from expanding some of the services the golf club offers (spas, workout facilities, pools, etc.) and changing up the membership styles to be more customizable and attractive.


Battle For Bankers

Private equity firms are really starting to piss off investment banking programs with their recruiting tactics. What’s next? Going “full SEC football” and laying dibs on middle school students? Okay, maybe that was a little exaggerated, but the recruiting intensity is ramping up as we see a lot of young talent heading away from Wall Street for Silicon Valley.

Michael Lewis: Not A Fan Of Deeb Salem 

I’ve always been a big fan of Michael Lewis’s work from Liar’s Poker to Moneyball (Flash Boys is still on my reading list). The other day he made fun of Deeb Salem, the former Goldman Sachs trader who is disgruntled about not getting the millions that he was “promised”, in a fake letter to his mother and oh was it funny.

All-Time Investor Scoreboard

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From @HarrimanHouse


 

Taking Another Look At The College Finance Curriculum

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Over the past year, I’ve had exposure to four different ways of learning about the world of finance:

  • In my most recent semester at Iowa, I completed classes including Investment Management, Corporate Finance, and Corporate & Financial Risk Management
    • Mostly full of lectures on theories that, for the most part, aren’t actually applied (CAPM, EMH) and heavily weighted on multiple exams
  • I sat for Level I of the CFA Program in early June after five months and 400+ hours of studying
    • Exam oriented (obviously) with a broad “foot deep and a mile wide” sense of learning about everything from ethics to dividend discount models
  • I’ve read articles and books on finance and investing in my own personal time
    • Often brings a more historical approach often citing previous examples in economic history at my own speed
  • I’ve learned about credit research analysis and the debt markets since starting my internship in January
    • Fast-paced environment approach to how analysis and bond trading is really done in the real world 

Each way of learning has its own pros and cons, but the various curriculums and methods have brought me a larger knowledge base nonetheless.

I recently read a blog post called “Rethinking The Finance Curriculum” by Tim Johnson and have found it to really hit the nail on the head. At the end of his great post that looks at typical business class requirements and the curriculum of the CFA Program, he comes to an interesting conclusion as to what should actually be emphasized:

In summary, my syllabus structure would be

1. The nature of money (macroeconomics and more)

2. The purpose of finance (history and ethics)

3. The practice of finance (behavioural, risk and asset management

4. Tools and techniques (optimisation, statistics)

While I do agree with most of his thoughts, here are three items that I think should be added to and/or most emphasized in the typical business curriculum regarding finance:

  1. Personal Finance & Financial Literacy – It’s a shame that this isn’t a required class or group of classes taught at every high school and again at a more in-depth level at colleges. No matter what career path you decide to venture into, you’ll need to at least understand the basic concepts of personal finance and financial literacy. Hell, even before you decide to venture into a career, you need to have a good grip as you’ll most likely be making a choice that will cost you tens of thousands of dollars: what college to attend. From understanding the banking system, loans, mortgages, savings and investing methods, products, and tools is increasingly important in today’s ever-changing financial world. Financial literacy is a huge key to success and it’s frighteningly shocking how few people can even calculate a monthly car payment anymore.
  2. An Emphasis On Economic History – Interning and listening to conversations between analysts (especially sovereign), portfolio managers, and traders has made me realize that I haven’t learned much about the history of finance or the financial system while at school. Frequently, I will read about or hear past economic events brought up, from the 1997 Asian financial crisis to the OPEC oil price shock, and I find myself not knowing nearly enough to participate in a discussion on the subjects. I’ve also found it increasingly important to learn how everything in the financial markets move when other parts and pieces move up and down. Hearing discussions about what will happen to Country X’s economic demand and currency strength if Event Y happens in Country Z is a very important side of finance that I have yet to learn much about in my classes.
  3. A Comprehensive Look At Major Industries, Sectors – While at my internship, creating models and analyzing companies in various industries and sectors has opened my eyes up to how little we actually learn about them in our current classes. Understanding how companies in the technology sector operate and how analysts valuate them versus other sectors would be great base information to know coming out of college. I would be willing to bet that most graduating finance students couldn’t name half of the sectors that make up the S&P 500.

I’m interested to hear the thoughts of others in the finance community. 

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